how to maintain forage quality during harvest and

Producing Hay from Native Warm

Producing NWSG Hay in Your Forage Program When Should I Harvest My NWSG for Hay? As with any forage grass there is a trade-off between forage quantity and quality For most forage grasses Fig 4 Little bluestem as its name implies is shorter than the other NWSG but still retains the "bunch" growth habit common to these species Fig 5

Self

Maintaining a self-propelled forage harvester adjusted for maximum performance in every crop is not only essential for producing a top-quality forage product but will make a measurable difference in fuel consumption during chopping That's a win-win situation – a higher-quality end product at a lower production cost PD

Making Storing and Feeding Hay

Quality The primary objective of any hay-feeding program is to provide plenty of high-quality hay to meet the animals' nutritional needs Many factors affect the quality of hay: soil fertility the stage of forage maturity when harvested the moisture available during the growing season harvesting

Using oats as a late

During the summer of 2019 we conducted a study to examine the planting of oats from July 15 through early September to examine tonnage and forage quality Through this trial planting date yield forage quality and an application of foliar fungicide to control oats crown rust was examined

Forage Yield Quality and Nitrate Concentration of Barley

The targeted harvest date was the "watery" to "milky" stage of kernel development to optimize both forage production and quality A harvest date was selected each year (14 Jul y 2000 12 July 2001 and 22 July 2002) when most of the entries were in the appropriate harvest stage

Harvesting Impacts on Forage Quality

May 04 2017Harvesting at Correct Stage Forage quality generally declines as the alfalfa plant matures We want to wait as long as we can to harvest because each day adds 100 to 200 lb/acre additional dry matter to total yield However waiting too long will cause the forage quality to be lower than we want or lower than we can market

Self

Keep up on engine maintenance this winter keep up in the fi eld during harvest Timing is everything during harvest and powerful John engines are dependable and ef fi cient enough to meet your tight schedule If you want to keep a fast pace next season make sure to clean and inspect your engine and components this winter

FORAGE PRODUCTION: COMPROMISES AMONG YIELD

Fig 6) While leaves maintain this very high level of digestibility through regrowth stem digestibility declines rapidly with maturity To maximize forage quality producers should be harvesting before stems dominate the forage (Fig 4 Harvest Interval 7) and prior

Harvest and Storage of Forage

Forage harvesting: best practices Across the Southeast growers continue to see the benefits of taking time before and during forage harvest to pave the way for optimum final results During harvest planning think about the following areas to help ensure a successful harvest and prepare the crop for ideal storage conditions

Forage harvest management that helps maintain or improve

Forage harvest management that helps maintain or improve wildlife habitat (cover and shelter) such as way and time frames so as optimize both forage yield/quality and wildlife cover and of harvest identified During implementation keep the following documentation for each field:

When to Harvest and How to Dry First

May 09 2017Watch the weather and harvest timing for a quick dry in the field to put up high-quality forage Winter small-grain silages will be the first spring forage crops ready to harvest The highest quality with reasonable tonnage will occur about five days after the flag leaf emerges at the flag leaf stage (Feekes 9 0)

Harvesting small grains for forage

Minnesota small grain crops can provide excellent-quality forage although the growth stage at cutting impacts both quality and quantity Impact of growth stage at harvest University of Minnesota research found that quality crude protein and in-vitro digestible dry matter is highest at the boot stage when the forage yield is 38 to 42 percent of that at the dough stage

It's Critical: Forage quality

Missing the mark and delaying harvest of that crop by 5-10 days will significantly reduce its quality and in turn require additional purchased feed cost to maintain production at a level similar to that of the high-quality forages We see this "miss" happen often in the spring when corn planting is occurring during forage harvest time

Harvest Storage

It takes timely management attention to detail and being ready to harvest when the forage is at optimal nutritive value Harvest and storage management decisions affect profitability of the entire forage enterprise With time this page will be a resource for information on best management practices for harvesting and storing high quality forages

Harvest Date and Hybrid Influence on Corn Forage Yield

Objectives of this study were to determine the effect of harvest date on yield and quality of corn hybrids and to describe the relationship between harvest date and the yield and quality of corn forage silage and stover During 1998 and 1999 four hybrids were harvested at eight different harvest times between 521 and 1224 growing degree

How to Maintain Forage Quality during Harvest and Storage

Mar 24 2020By maintaining the chamber loss below 3% the effect on forage quality is relatively small (Table 1) Baling at the appropriate moisture content is important for minimizing harvest loss and maintaining quality following harvest For low-density (small rectangular and most large round) bales the recommended baling moisture content is about 18%

From Harvest to Feed: Understanding Silage Management

Small grain species vary somewhat in their nutritive content for silage at the same stage of growth (Table 8) Cutting rye early in the boot stage is important to maintain forage quality Harvest of barley oats and wheat can be delayed until soft dough stage to increase forage yield Figure 5

The Baleage Advantage (Over Dry Hay) – Makin' Hay

FACT: Forage is at its highest quality when it's cut FACT: Waiting for it to dry will negatively impact forage quality FACT: The extra cost required to bale high-moisture hay (vs dry hay) could easily be offset by reducing hay losses* during harvesting storage and feeding *Based on data collected on swathed alfalfa by Dr Dan Undersander forage agronomist at the University of Wisconsin

Self

Maintaining a self-propelled forage harvester adjusted for maximum performance in every crop is not only essential for producing a top-quality forage product but will make a measurable difference in fuel consumption during chopping That's a win-win situation – a higher-quality end product at a lower production cost PD

Grain Sorghum: Harvesting Drying and Storing

The optimum harvest moisture about 20 percent minimizes harvest losses and drying expense Because field drying is difficult and leads to excessive field losses from birds wildlife and lodging harvest early and dry your sorghum mechanically to maintain quality and minimize harvest losses

Evaluating CSPS during harvest will help optimize the

Please keep this in mind if you are harvesting immature corn silage When preparing the harvesting equipment keep in mind that lower DM silages (32% DM) will not require as much processing for good utilization while higher DM silages (36% DM) will require

Forage harvest management that helps maintain or improve

Forage harvest management that helps maintain or improve wildlife habitat (cover and shelter) such as way and time frames so as optimize both forage yield/quality and wildlife cover and of harvest identified During implementation keep the following documentation for each field:

Using oats as a late

During the summer of 2019 we conducted a study to examine the planting of oats from July 15 through early September to examine tonnage and forage quality Through this trial planting date yield forage quality and an application of foliar fungicide to control oats crown rust was examined

Sampling Hay Silage and Total Mixed Rations for Analysis

during harvesting What to sample A "lot" of hay or silage is the forage Keep the core sampler tip sharp so it cuts Forage quality analysis before and after ensiling Forage type Dry matter Crude protein ADF NDF Alfalfa haylage Before ensiling 44 1 19 9 32 3 40 5